Ten Horse Show Parents Chime In on How to Best Support Your Child at… – United States Eventing Association

Did your kiddo catch the eventing bug? While it can feel a bit overwhelming at first, we know you will find the sport and community of eventing to be a fun and welcoming one. Getting through the learning curve can feel a bit cumbersome, but top eventing parents from around the country chimed in to share some of their best words of wisdom to make your transition into your new role as a horse show mom/dad extraordinaire as smooth as possible.
Nancy B: “Teach them how to time manage school with riding. Teach them how to organize and plan ahead. My daughter had a planner and each week wrote in all her responsibilities for the week. She created a show list and taped it inside her show trunk and would use it to be sure everything she needed was packed. Let them pack their own show trunks. Let them make mistakes and learn from them. Volunteer so you can learn more about the sport. It will be helpful for the good days and the bad. Good luck to all, and remember to enjoy the moments!”
Stacey C: “Let the coach, coach! Then read that again. It isn’t the journey up the levels, it is the safety of horse and rider. Never tell your kid what they can do better, just hug and be supportive. Remind them it is always, always, always about the horse first no matter how tired your kid is. The horse comes first, it is a trusting relationship between the two.”
Kathy S: “Buy a battery-powered scooter so you can race back to the barn every time she forgets something right before going into the ring! This was a lifesaver when mine was young and very forgetful!”
Danielle V: “Have a tribe of more experienced horse show moms and dads and learn everything you can from them. Pay attention to how they prep for shows, what they bring, and how they organize.”
Kellie A: “I am new to this and still learning. Be patient and supportive. I refer to myself as the barn/show mom. I try to sweep for everyone and pack lunches for long show days. The coaches and riders have enough to worry about.”
PJ W: “Don’t just drop your child at the barn and go on your way! Watch the lessons, watch the on-site and off-site training especially when not under the guidance of their trainer, and give them support at shows. You will watch their independence grow and learn when to back off.”
Paula C: “It’s not all about the placing. Don’t let them get caught in that! They need to understand early on that it’s a very humbling & hard sport, and they need to go out there and do their best on that day. If it were easy, everyone would be doing it!”
Sue M: “Keep two of everything (that’s reasonable), you never know when something will break or a fellow competitor needs help. Keep a double-sided checklist, one side for you to check off needed items, then have your child do the same.”
Lisa E: “Have them talk through their schedule with you so they know they are prepared. You also have to let them fail sometimes in order for them to not make that mistake again-whether it be not walking the course enough times or not getting ready and into warm-up on time.”
And lastly this sage piece of advice from Debi R: “Perfect your margarita recipe and bring enough for all of your friends.”
Eventers are a different “breed” of equestrian. They are considered fearless by some and a little crazy by others, but for me, they are amazingly kind and generous. I was blessed to be a recipient of this unbelievable kindness and generosity when the incredible Orion’s Rosealene (“Rosie”) entered my life. Sustained through three generations, Rosie, a buckskin Connemara/Arabian, altered the riding careers of three young eventers. My name is Anyah Luke, and I am forever indebted to Maddie and Luann McElduff for sharing Rosie with me.
The United States Eventing Association (USEA) proudly offers three regional Future Event Horse (FEH) Championships and two regional Young Event Horse (YEH) Championships annually. Together, the FEH and YEH programs have created a pipeline for young horses to showcase their talent, while judges identify horses that will be successful at the four-star and five-star levels of eventing.
After two years of research and writing, the United States Eventing Association (USEA) is proud to officially release the USEA Eventing Handbook by the Levels to its membership. Created by members of the USEA Instructors’ Certification Program (ICP) Committee with the input of licensed officials, professional riders, rider safety experts, and many other key players in the industry, this all encompassing handbook outlines clear and consistent guidelines for riders and trainers to refer to when navigating their way through the competition levels. Featuring rider requirements, exercises, demonstrated skills, evaluation tools, and more at the Starter through Advanced levels, this highly anticipated resource is by far the most comprehensive level-by-level guide for the sport of eventing in North America.
With April just a day away, it’s time for full fledged prep mode for the 2022 Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event. Official entries were announced this morning with a total of 57 horse and rider pairs representing seven different countries slated to compete. View the entire list of five-star entries here. The entries for the CCI4*-S can be seen here.
Official Joint Therapy Treatment of the USEA
Official Feed of the USEA
Official Saddle of the USEA
Official Real Estate Partner of the USEA
Official Equine Insurance of the USEA
Official Forage of the USEA
Official Supplement Feeding System of the USEA
Official Horse Clothing of the USEA
Official Outerwear of the USEA
Official Competition & Training Apparel of the USEA

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