How to Beat Inflation: 3 Easy Ways to Save Money on Shopping – CNET

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Rising inflation has crunched budgets. New shopping habits could save you big bucks.
Katie Teague
Writer
Katie is a Writer at CNET, covering all things how-to. When she’s not writing, she enjoys playing in golf scrambles, practicing yoga and spending time on the lake.
CNET editors independently choose every product and service we cover. Though we can’t review every available financial company or offer, we strive to make comprehensive, rigorous comparisons in order to highlight the best of them. When you apply for products or services through our links, we may earn a commission. The compensation we receive and other factors, such as your location, may impact how ads and links appear on our site.
We are an independent publisher. Our advertisers do not direct our editorial content. Any opinions, analyses, reviews, or recommendations expressed in editorial content are those of the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved, or otherwise endorsed by the advertiser.
To support our work, we are paid in different ways for providing advertising services. For example, some advertisers pay us to display ads, others pay us when you click on certain links, and others pay us when you submit your information to request a quote or other offer details. CNET’s compensation is never tied to whether you purchase an insurance product. We don’t charge you for our services. The compensation we receive and other factors, such as your location, may impact what ads and links appear on our site, and how, where, and in what order ads and links appear.
Our insurance content may include references to or advertisements by our corporate affiliate HomeInsurance.com LLC, a licensed insurance producer (NPN: 8781838). And HomeInsurance.com LLC may receive compensation from third parties if you choose to visit and transact on their website. However, all CNET editorial content is independently researched and developed without regard to our corporate relationship to HomeInsurance.com LLC or its advertiser relationships.
Our content may include summaries of insurance providers, or their products or services. CNET is not an insurance agency or broker. We do not transact in the business of insurance in any manner, and we are not attempting to sell insurance or asking or urging you to apply for a particular kind of insurance from a particular company.
In a digital world, information only matters if it’s timely, relevant, and credible. We promise to do whatever is necessary to get you the information you need when you need it, to make our opinions fair and useful, and to make sure our facts are accurate.
If a popular product is on store shelves, you can count on CNET for immediate commentary and benchmark analysis as soon as possible. We promise to publish credible information we have as soon as we have it, throughout a product’s life cycle, from its first public announcement to any potential recall or emergence of a competing device.
How will we know if we’re fulfilling our mission? We constantly monitor our competition, user activity, and journalistic awards. We scour and scrutinize blogs, sites, aggregators, RSS feeds, and any other available resources, and editors at all levels of our organization continuously review our coverage.
But you’re the final judge. We ask that you inform us whenever you find an error, spot a gap in our coverage, or have any other suggestions for improvement. Readers are part of the CNET family, and the strength of that relationship is the ultimate test of our success. Find out more here.
Save money at restaurants and the gas pump to keep more cash in your wallet.
The Federal Reserve’s decision to raise interest rates to fight inflation could help with rising costs eventually, but economic experts don’t expect the move to bring down the prices of food, gas or consumer products anytime soon. In a press briefing Wednesday, Fed Chairman Jerome Powell said, « The expectation is that inflation will come down in the second half of the year. »
For now, as gas prices soar and inflation rocks household budgets, you may be looking for ways to save money and offset rising costs. When prices are high, spending less on dining at restaurants or shopping can reap big rewards. Fortunately, I’ve found a few ways to still do the things you love while also saving some money.
I’ll tell you ways to save on eating at restaurants and filling up your gas tank, and how to get a better deal on devices. For more saving tips, check out these easy and free ways to save money on your gas, electric and water bills.
If you often spend money on eating out at restaurants and shopping, you’ll want to know this tip. You can buy gift cards online with a balance higher than what you pay. That’s right. People often receive gift cards to stores and restaurants they don’t like or will never go to and they sell them online. You can also get a little bit of cash back. Here are some places to check out. 
CardCash: You can buy unwanted gift cards on CardCash and it’ll tell you the amount the card is worth and what you’re paying. Just search for any store or restaurant you frequent to see what’s available. For instance, I found a $25 Cheesecake Factory gift card for $20.48 (18.1% savings). Plus the site is running a $3 off your $25 purchase deal if you’re new. CardCash offers a 45-day money-back guarantee on all purchases
Gift Card Granny: This one works a bit differently. You earn cash back for every gift card you buy on Gift Card Granny. For example, a $50 Lowe’s card will get you $0.50 back. Gift Card Granny has a « 100% Lifetime Guarantee » on its gift cards.
Who knows how long gas prices will continue to climb. However, there you can save a bit at the pump if you’re part of a membership club. Here are a few places that offer fuel discounts (and other perks). Plus, check out these other ways to save on gas.
Kroger: When you spend money on groceries at Kroger, the total spent is converted into points that you can use toward fuel. Each month, for every 100 points earned, you get $0.10 off, up to $1 off per gallon. Your points expire at the end of the following month. Even if you don’t have any points, you can still save $0.03 per gallon at the pump.
Sam’s Club: You can become a Sam’s Club member by paying an annual fee of $45. With that, you can save $0.05 per gallon when you buy gas.
Walmart Plus: If you join Walmart Plus for $98 annually, you can save $0.05 per gallon at the pump — and that includes Sam’s Club gas stations.
Costco: A $60 membership to Costco gets you access to one of the cheapest places to buy gas in the US. 
Save on things you spend money on often.
Not quite ready to spend $1,000 on a mobile phone or other electronic device? You don’t have to. Instead, you can shop around for used and refurbished devices, as well as products that are considered open box. Check these places out.
Amazon Warehouse: You can find pre-owned, used and open box items in great condition from Amazon Warehouse. I bought an « open box » Ecovacs Deebot at a crazy good discount and it was still in its original packaging. Sometimes these items are bought and returned without being opened, but still have to be categorized as « used » and « open box. »
Best Buy Outlet Deals: Just like Amazon, Best Buy has its own section for open box deals. For instance, I found an Apple iPad Pro for $946 open box. The original price is $1,099. For refurbished or preowned products, you can choose to see only those devices by checking the boxes under the « Condition » section.
Apple: Only use Apple products? Check out the Apple refurbished items where you can save on iPhones, iPads, Apple Watches and more. While you won’t find the newest iPhone 13, you can still save $250 on the iPhone 11 Pro. 

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